Colour of the day no. 19 – Plum crazy

solid block of colour plum crazy

Colour of the day 19 - Plum crazy

Plum Crazy

In 1970 The Chrysler Corporation designed a range of ‘high impact’ colours for their new range of cars, the Dodge Charger, Challenger and Road Runner. Other colours included Go Mango, Panther Pink, Green Go. Dodge has reissued ‘Plum Crazy’ for their new 2010 Challenger model

We’d love to know via the comments below what Plum crazy reminds you of or makes you think about. We’re also running a weekly competition where people can re-name a colour. If you had to re-name this colour, what would you call it? There will be a weekly prize of a pot of paint containing the colour and labelled with your new name and a £10 Amazon voucher.

Colour of the day

Throughout the Brighton Festival a colour of the day will be displayed in Fabrica and on this blog. To help decide which colour to choose we asked Anne Wight who is a grapheme synaesthete. This is a form of synaesthesia in which an individual’s perception of numbers and letters is associated with an experience of colour.

Like all forms of synaesthesia, grapheme-colour synaesthesia is involuntary, consistent, and memorable and is one of the most common forms of synaesthesia. Generally, while it is extremely unlikely that any two synaesthetes will report the same colours for all letters and numbers, studies of large numbers of synaesthetes find that there are some commonalities across letters.

We have chosen colours/pigments/paints for each day loosely based the colours she sees for the dates of May’s Festival.

Colour of the day no. 18 – Gamboge

solid block of colour

Colour of the day 18 - Gamboge

Gamboge

A gum resin that comes from evergreen trees in south-east Asia. It can be used as a drug or a pigment. First used in England in the 17th Century for watercolour painting. The resin is poured into bamboo shoots and removed in cylindrical pieces. The word gamboge comes from gambogium, the Latin word for the pigment, which derives from Gambogia, the Latin word for Cambodia.

We’d love to know via the comments below what Gamboge reminds you of or makes you think about. We’re also running a weekly competition where people can re-name a colour. If you had to re-name this colour, what would you call it? There will be a weekly prize of a pot of paint containing the colour and labelled with your new name and a £10 Amazon voucher.

Colour of the day

Throughout the Brighton Festival a colour of the day will be displayed in Fabrica and on this blog. To help decide which colour to choose we asked Anne Wight who is a grapheme synaesthete. This is a form of synaesthesia in which an individual’s perception of numbers and letters is associated with an experience of colour.

Like all forms of synaesthesia, grapheme-colour synaesthesia is involuntary, consistent, and memorable and is one of the most common forms of synaesthesia. Generally, while it is extremely unlikely that any two synaesthetes will report the same colours for all letters and numbers, studies of large numbers of synaesthetes find that there are some commonalities across letters.

We have chosen colours/pigments/paints for each day loosely based the colours she sees for the dates of May’s Festival.

Colour of the day no. 17 – Dragon’s Blood

solid block of colour dragon's blood

Colour of the day 17 - Dragon's Blood

Dragon’s Blood

A dark red resin that comes from certain trees in eastern Asia. In use since ancient times. The dry resin looks similar to dried blood, which probably gave rise to the legend that the substance was the mingled blood of dragon and elephant.

We’d love to know via the comments below what Dragon’s Blood reminds you of or makes you think about. We’re also running a weekly competition where people can re-name a colour. If you had to re-name this colour, what would you call it? There will be a weekly prize of a pot of paint containing the colour and labelled with your new name and a £10 Amazon voucher.

Colour of the day

Throughout the Brighton Festival a colour of the day will be displayed in Fabrica and on this blog. To help decide which colour to choose we asked Anne Wight who is a grapheme synaesthete. This is a form of synaesthesia in which an individual’s perception of numbers and letters is associated with an experience of colour.

Like all forms of synaesthesia, grapheme-colour synaesthesia is involuntary, consistent, and memorable and is one of the most common forms of synaesthesia. Generally, while it is extremely unlikely that any two synaesthetes will report the same colours for all letters and numbers, studies of large numbers of synaesthetes find that there are some commonalities across letters.

We have chosen colours/pigments/paints for each day loosely based the colours she sees for the dates of May’s Festival.

Colour of the day no. 16 – NIVO

Solid block of colour NIVO

Colour of the day 16 - NIVO

NIVO Night Invisible Varnish Orfordness, was a dark green introduced on night bomber aircraft in 1923. It was produced in a matt finish after trials at Orford Ness. It was a mix of yellow ochre, lithopone and ultramarine blue. Orford Ness, is a spit of land in Suffolk that was home to the Central Flying School’s Experimental Flight Establishment, which among other things, did a lot of work on camouflage. Humbrol 75 is the closest match.

We’d love to know via the comments below what NIVO reminds you of or makes you think about. We’re also running a weekly competition where people can re-name a colour. If you had to re-name this colour, what would you call it? There will be a weekly prize of a pot of paint containing the colour and labelled with your new name and a £10 Amazon voucher.

Colour of the day

Throughout the Brighton Festival a colour of the day will be displayed in Fabrica and on this blog. To help decide which colour to choose we asked Anne Wight who is a grapheme synaesthete. This is a form of synaesthesia in which an individual’s perception of numbers and letters is associated with an experience of colour.

Like all forms of synaesthesia, grapheme-colour synaesthesia is involuntary, consistent, and memorable and is one of the most common forms of synaesthesia. Generally, while it is extremely unlikely that any two synaesthetes will report the same colours for all letters and numbers, studies of large numbers of synaesthetes find that there are some commonalities across letters.

We have chosen colours/pigments/paints for each day loosely based the colours she sees for the dates of May’s Festival.

Colour of the day no. 15 – Turacine red

solid block of colour turacine red

Colour of the day 15 - Turacine red

Turacine red

Identified in 1869 as a remarkable new animal-derived pigment. It comes from the Touraco; an African fruit eating bird. It is extracted from only the fifteen of the pinion feathers on the wings of the bird. The entire plumage of one bird yields not more than three grains of pigment.

We’d love to know via the comments below what Turacine red reminds you of or makes you think about. We’re also running a weekly competition where people can re-name a colour. If you had to re-name this colour, what would you call it? There will be a weekly prize of a pot of paint containing the colour and labelled with your new name and a £10 Amazon voucher.

Colour of the day

Throughout the Brighton Festival a colour of the day will be displayed in Fabrica and on this blog. To help decide which colour to choose we asked Anne Wight who is a grapheme synaesthete. This is a form of synaesthesia in which an individual’s perception of numbers and letters is associated with an experience of colour.

Like all forms of synaesthesia, grapheme-colour synaesthesia is involuntary, consistent, and memorable and is one of the most common forms of synaesthesia. Generally, while it is extremely unlikely that any two synaesthetes will report the same colours for all letters and numbers, studies of large numbers of synaesthetes find that there are some commonalities across letters.

We have chosen colours/pigments/paints for each day loosely based the colours she sees for the dates of May’s Festival.

Colour of the day no. 14 – Mummy

solid block of colour mummy

Colour of the day 14 - Mummy

Mummy

A pigment used widely in the 17th and 18th Centuries and produced from Egyptian mummies, which when ground produce a brown pigment with good transparency. One Egyptian mummy gave sufficient amounts to satisfy the demands of one colourman’s customers for seven years.  It was particularly useful for glazes in portraiture.

We’d love to know via the comments below what Mummy reminds you of or makes you think about. We’re also running a weekly competition where people can re-name a colour. If you had to re-name this colour, what would you call it? There will be a weekly prize of a pot of paint containing the colour and labelled with your new name and a £10 Amazon voucher.

Colour of the day

Throughout the Brighton Festival a colour of the day will be displayed in Fabrica and on this blog. To help decide which colour to choose we asked Anne Wight who is a grapheme synaesthete. This is a form of synaesthesia in which an individual’s perception of numbers and letters is associated with an experience of colour.

Like all forms of synaesthesia, grapheme-colour synaesthesia is involuntary, consistent, and memorable and is one of the most common forms of synaesthesia. Generally, while it is extremely unlikely that any two synaesthetes will report the same colours for all letters and numbers, studies of large numbers of synaesthetes find that there are some commonalities across letters.

We have chosen colours/pigments/paints for each day loosely based the colours she sees for the dates of May’s Festival.

Colour of the day no. 13 – Chocolate comtesse

solid block of colour chocolate comtesse

Colour of the day no 13 - Chocolate comtesse

Chocolate Comtesse

A Crown housepaint consistently popular in the 1990’s from their ‘Fashion for Walls’ Indulgence range. Its popularity can be attributed to the interior trend of wooden flooring and the massive rise of the brown leather sofa, with consumers seeking tones that complemented this type of interior style.

We’d love to know via the comments below what Chocolate comtesse reminds you of or makes you think about. We’re also running a weekly competition where people can re-name a colour. If you had to re-name this colour, what would you call it? There will be a weekly prize of a pot of paint containing the colour and labelled with your new name and a £10 Amazon voucher.

Colour of the day

Throughout the Brighton Festival a colour of the day will be displayed in Fabrica and on this blog. To help decide which colour to choose we asked Anne Wight who is a grapheme synaesthete. This is a form of synaesthesia in which an individual’s perception of numbers and letters is associated with an experience of colour.

Like all forms of synaesthesia, grapheme-colour synaesthesia is involuntary, consistent, and memorable and is one of the most common forms of synaesthesia. Generally, while it is extremely unlikely that any two synaesthetes will report the same colours for all letters and numbers, studies of large numbers of synaesthetes find that there are some commonalities across letters.

We have chosen colours/pigments/paints for each day loosely based the colours she sees for the dates of May’s Festival.